Largest MH370 debris suspects detected in S Indian Ocean

Flight lieutenant Russell Adams speaks to reporters regarding search operations for flight MH370. (Internet photo)

Flight lieutenant Russell Adams speaks to reporters regarding search operations for flight MH370. (Internet photo)

Four large orange objects assumed to be debris from the Malaysia Airlines flight 370 have been located in the Southern Indian Ocean by a P-3C patrol aircraft deployed from the No. 10 Squadron of the Royal Australian Air Force stationed at base Pearce, reports Hong Kong-based Phoenix Television.

All of the suspected objects had been positioned via GPS before the aircraft returned to the base, said flight lieutenant Russell Adams, pilot of the P-3C. Adams added that the floating objects are at least two meters in length and the information will be passed to the Rescue Coordination Centre in Canberra.

The four objects are by far the largest detected since the first day of rescue operations, though the final decision to further investigate will remain in the hands of the Rescue Coordination Centre, Adams said.

The latest guesses of the fate of flight MH370 have traced it to a region which covers the South China Sea and Southern Indian Ocean. In addition to the P-3C, Australia has also deployed naval vessels, the HMAS Success and ADV Ocean Shield, to aid rescue operations.

The ADV Ocean Shield is carrying a black box locater with specialised sonar equipment, according to the Beijing Morning Post. With the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder inside, the black box can help the Rescue Coordination Centre determine the true cause of the flight’s demise. The black box battery will run out on April 12, at which point signals will no longer be sent and detection will become virtually impossible, said the report.

 

WANTCHINATIMES

 

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